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Five Surprising Allergy and Asthma Triggers that Spoil Summer Fun (May 10, 2012)
Health Risks Greater for Asthmatic Baby Boomers over Age 60 (May 1, 2012)
Free Asthma and Allergy Screenings Offered Nationwide (April 23, 2012)
Record Pollen Counts Cause Even More Misery (March 20, 2012)
What Four Factors Influence the Severity of Allergy Season? (March 8, 2012)
Are You Making Your Spring Allergies Worse? (March 1, 2012)
Almost Half of Asthma Sufferers Not Using Needed Controller Medications (Feb. 25, 2012)
ACAAI Recognizes Teva Respiratory for its Support of Important Respiratory Initiatives
Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease Linked to Childhood Second-Hand Smoke Exposure (December 19, 2011)
Six Tips to Ensure Allergies And Asthma Don't Ruin Holiday Cheer (December 2011)
Thanksgiving Holiday Stuffed with Allergy, Asthma Triggers (November, 2011)
Unplug Indoor Pollutants for a Breath of Fresh Air (November 6, 2011)
Love Your Pet Not Your Allergy? (November 6, 2011)
Wine May Please the Palate but Not the Immune System (November 5, 2011)
Research Examines Asthma Control and Anaphylaxis Guidelines to Improve Outcomes for Adults with Allergies and Asthma (November 5, 2011)
Research Highlights New Interventions, Recommendations for Controlling Allergies & Asthma in Children (November 5, 2011)
Allergy Shots Fast-Track Relief and Cut Costs (November 3, 2011)
Don't Let Allergies, Asthma Spoil Halloween Fun (October 1, 2011)
Mold Exposure During Infancy Increases Asthma Risk (August 2, 2011)
Study Up for Sneeze and Wheeze-Free School Year (August 1, 2011)
Global Warming Extends Ragweed Allergy Season (July 28, 2011)
Childhood Asthma Linked to Depression during Pregnancy (July 5, 2011)
Allergists Update Stinging Insect Guidelines (June 16, 2011)
Don't Let Allergies, Asthma Spoil a Summer Soiree (June 15, 2011)
Cure Summertime Allergies - It's Worth a Shot (June 5, 2011)
Athletes with Allergies, Asthma Can Play it Safe (June 1, 2011)
Flood Water Can Make Air In Homes Unhealthy (April 29, 2010)
Free Screenings Launch in May's National Asthma Awareness Month
Pregnancy anemia linked to childhood wheezing and asthma (March 10, 2011)
Spring allergy Sufferers: Be Wary of Treatment Myths, March 4, 2011
Most Americans Recognize Allergies are Serious, Don't Know Who Should Treat Condition
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  Are You Making Your Spring Allergies Worse?

Five Things that Can Aggravate Your Suffering 

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill. (March 1, 2012) - Fruits and veggies, air filters, spring breezes, procrastination and self-medication – each can delay relief from a stuffy nose, sneezing, sniffling or other symptoms if you’re one of the more than 35 million Americans who suffer from seasonal allergies.  

“People with spring allergies often don’t realize how many things can aggravate their allergy symptoms so they just muddle along and hope for an early end to the season,” said Myron Zitt, M.D., past president of the ACAAI.  “But there’s no reason to suffer. A few simple adjustments in habits and treatment can make springtime much more enjoyable.”

The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) and its allergist members alert people with spring allergies to be on the lookout for these five things that can aggravate suffering.  

  1. Noshing on fruits and veggies – Many people with seasonal allergies also suffer from pollen food allergy syndrome (also called oral allergy syndrome), a cross-reaction between the similar proteins in certain types of fruits, vegetables (and some nuts) and the allergy-causing pollen. One in five people with grass allergies and as many as 70 percent of people with birch tree allergies suffer from the condition, which can make your lips tingle and swell and your mouth itch. The trick is to determine which problematic produce is causing your symptoms and then avoid eating it, (although you might be able to eat it if it’s peeled, cooked or canned). If you’re allergic to birch or alder trees, you might have a reaction to celery, cherries or apples. If you have grass allergies, tomatoes, potatoes or peaches may bother you. Usually the reaction is simply annoying and doesn’t last long. But up to 9 percent of people have reactions that affect a part of their body beyond their mouth and 1.7 percent can suffer a life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylactic shock. If you’ve had a systemic reaction, you should see an allergist and ask whether you should carry injectable epinephine. Visit www.AllergyAndAsthmaRelief.org to find an allergist near you.
  2. Using the wrong air filter – Using an air filter to keep your home pollen-free is a good idea, but be sure it’s the right kind. Studies show inexpensive central furnace/air conditioning filters and ionic electrostatic room cleaners aren’t helpful – and in fact the latter releases ions, which can be an irritant. Whole-house filtration systems do work, but change the filters regularly or you could be doing more harm than good. 
  3. Opening your windows – When your windows are open, the pollen can drift inside, settle into your carpet, furniture and car upholstery and continue to torture you. So keep your house and car windows shut during allergy season.  
  4. Procrastinating – You may think you can put off or even do without medication this spring, but the next thing you know you’re stuffed up, sneezing and downright miserable. Instead, get the jump on allergies by taking your medication before the season gets under way.
  5. Self medicating – Perhaps you’re not sure exactly what’s making you feel awful so you switch from one medication to the next hoping for relief.  Your best bet is to see an allergist, who can determine just what’s triggering your symptoms and suggest treatment. Visit www.AllergyAndAsthmaRelief.org to find an allergist near you.  You might even benefit from allergy shots (immunotherapy), which can stop the suffering altogether.

Visit www.AllergyAndAsthmaRelief.org to learn more about spring allergies and to find an allergist near you who can ensure you get the best treatment and aren’t aggravating your symptoms. 

 
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