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ACAAI > Patients & Public > Allergies > Seasonal Allergies > Seasonal Allergies > Spring Allergy Advice | ACAAI

Spring Allergy Advice

Spring Allergy Sufferers: Be Wary of Treatment Myths

Knowing fact from fiction can make the difference between misery and relief for millions of spring allergy sufferers.

Record Pollen Season Brings Misery Across Country: Allergists Offer Survival Tips

Record snow, heavy early spring rains, followed by a rapid warm up have created the perfect storm for allergy season. But allergists from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology can offer ways to help people find relief.

Global Warming Increases Misery for Nation's 35 Million Allergy Sufferers

As spring approaches, the nation's 35 million people with allergies can blame global warming for some of their suffering. Weather conditions have a significant effect on the levels of pollen and mold in the air, which in turn affects the severity of allergy symptoms. Typically, the common allergens that cause allergic rhinitis ("hay fever") flourish when the weather is warm.

Top 5 Spring Allergy Mistakes to Avoid This Season

Do you sneeze and wheeze all spring long? If so, you may be making common mistakes that prevent you from keeping your allergy symptoms under control.

Keep Your Green Thumb,Avoid the Red Nose

If you have a green thumb but are bothered by a red, stuffy nose caused by seasonal allergies, the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) offers information to help you maximize time spent tending plants rather than sniffles.

Allergy Vaccinations Reduce Children's Health Care Costs by One-Third

Allergy immunotherapy, generally referred to as allergy vaccinations or shots, reduce total health care costs in children with allergic rhinitis (hay fever) by one-third, and prescription costs by 16 percent, according to a study published this month in Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, the scientific journal of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).